Spartan Speculations: Second Half Heroics

By: Charles Ranspach

Like the Chilean miners coming up from the ground, I have emerged!

Before I get into the post I first want to pat myself on the back for a great reference to headlines from 2010. But more importantly, I want to apologize for taking a longer break than usual.

With all of the stuff happening off of the court recently in East Lansing, I have been trying to figure out how to address it. The conclusion I came up with: I do not know the facts, have no inside information, and am finding everything out the same time as everyone else. Due to those circumstances, I am not qualified to talk on the subject, so I will not. That being said I hope that thoughts and prayers will be sent to the families and people going through this tough time. I also hope that after the investigation is complete that the school leaders will make the necessary decision to rid this culture from the school.

Ok, now back to the court.

Since my last post, MSU has gone 4-0 with some impressive play from some of their most important players. The Illinois win came from amazing shooting, even though there were 25 turnovers. Wisconsin was stemmed from a 24 point game by Miles Bridges on a night where emotions were high. Maryland on the road two days after the news was broke and a game against Wisconsin felt like a trap game. The first half looked as if that were true, then Cash Winston and defense helped bring the Spartans back and win comfortably. Lastly, a poor turnover filled first half was followed by a dominant second half to give the Spartans five straight wins.

I have said this before, but turnovers are killing us:

This team could be great. I argue that the Spartans could be the best team in the country if they just averaged six turnovers a game. That’s not asking thaaaaaaaat much. The most concerning thing about the turnovers is the fact that a lot of them are unforced errors. Bad passes, lazy movement, or high flying fancy plays that end up with the ball in the stands.

It is shown when you have awful starts and whole halves followed by complete dominance. Usually, the turnover difference is huge.

In the end, youth is a big reason for this problem. Four sophomores and a freshman start. This is a stark contrast to a team like Purdue who start four seniors.

Another thing that causes this is chemistry. When you have a lineup of Cash, Mcquaid, Bridges, Goins, and Schilling, you’re going to have issues. The chemistry is just not there.

Ward is frustrating as hell:

Man, I yell at my TV a lot, something I’m working on. But if Nick Ward doesn’t change some of his play style, it’s going to continue. His attitude is horrible, he can’t seem to figure out a double team, and can’t play more than 20 minutes.

On the flip side, he scores at the rim almost every time he gets the ball low and he runs the court great. I have even been impressed with his post up D as of late.

Everyone must come to the realization that Nick Ward will disappear from game to game, but if he’s on, he can ABSOLUTELY win us a game. And who knows, this might have to happen.

The schedule sucks:

Over the last two years, this team has not been good on the road. Statistically younger players struggle on the road.

Well, let’s look at the last month of the season. We only have two home games left. THANK GOD Purdue is at home! I expect to see our guys struggle, IU and Minnesota seem like loseable games, but I think the talent difference will allow us to win.

MSU takes on Indiana on Saturday night on ESPN. Look for Bridges to continue this newly found form and Cash to lead us to victory.

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